Consulting Scientist

Prof. John Kastelein

Therapeutic Areas

  • Cardiovascular diseases

Useful Links

John J.P. Kastelein (1954) is Professor of Medicine at the Department of Vascular Medicine at the Academic Medical Center (AMC) of the University of Amsterdam, where he holds the Strategic Chair of Genetics of Cardiovascular Disease.

Therapeutic Areas and Expertise

Professor Kastelein has published over 850 research papers in peer reviewed journals, including Nature Genetics, Lancet, New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA and Circulation and has a Hirsch index of 102 as of March 2017. His citations reached 6100 in 2016 and he is listed among the 3000 Highly Cited Researchers 2014; Dr. Kastelein is at the 10th position for the Netherlands and on the 2nd position for the Unviversity of Amsterdam.

He received his medical degree in Amsterdam in 1980 where he subsequently received specialty training in internal medicine. Between 1986 and 1988, he was trained in medical genetics, lipidology and molecular biology at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver under the guidance of Prof. Dr. M.R. Hayden. In 1997 and 1998, he served a visiting Professorship at the Center for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Upon his return to the Netherlands, he was awarded a doctorate (Cum Laude) and in 1989 he founded the Lipid Research Clinic at the Academic Medical Center (AMC) in Amsterdam, which is currently serving as a tertiary referral centre and has become part of the department of Vascular Medicine.

The most important concept in Dr. Kastelein’s research career, developed initially at the University of British Columbia, by his mentor Dr. Hayden, and subsequently transformed into practice at the AMC in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, is the “extreme genetics” approach. This approach teaches that the study of rare human disorders that are associated with premature coronary disease have broader relevance for the understanding of the etiology of heart disease in general and will yield therapeutic targets that are valid for all patients.